Exit Cards

I learned about Exit Cards this summer, when I was taking the Evaluation of Learning course. Exit Cards is a more general assessment method that combines the best of the Minute Paper and the Muddiest Point – and other assessment techniques. Basically it’s an umbrella term for enabling students to spend five minutes, at the end of class, thinking about the lesson and providing feedback to the instructor about what they have learned, or feedback about the teaching, or questions that remain about the lesson, or even a reflection on how they are learning – and what they could do better.

It’s so easy to prepare: simply take an index card, or an 8×11″ sheet of paper, and – before class – write the question to ask the students. One or two questions is sufficient, there’s no need to ask much more than that.

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Examples of Exit Cards – Vida Morkunas – CC Attribution, Non Commercial, Share Alike

All this to say that I fell in love with the concept, its freedom to setup, the great variety of questions that I could use with my students. Tonight I was busy wrapping up a few of my projects and was stressing out a bit – so I decided let the creative juices flow and create a little infographic about exit cards, hope you like it.

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Exit Cards – Vida Morkunas – CC Attribution, Non Commercial, Share Alike
Exit Cards

More Ideas for Creativity in the Classroom

The Fusion Blog offers 20 ideas to promote more creativity in the classroom. Not only are there twenty different ideas to choose from, but each idea offers additional resources to choose from. What a great post!

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20 Ideas to Promote More Creativity in Your Classroom – Fusion Blog (2016)

In particular, I like the ideas of making time for visual reflection, integrating time for hands-on reflection and keeping the classroom layout flexible. I have often re-arranged the layout of a classroom to suit an activity such as discussion groups or even smaller buzz groups.

When I first started teaching, I used to spend all my time lecturing. Nowadays, I like to break up my classes into short stints of lecturing and longer periods of discussion among the students on little problems or to deepen a point that was made in class. As students discuss the questions that I ask of them, I like to circulate in my classroom and eavesdrop, or ask more questions to move their discussions forward.

Reference

Guerrero, A. (2016). Twenty Ideas to Promote More Creativity In Your Classroom. Retrieved from http://www.fusionyearbooks.com/blog/creative-classrooms/

More Ideas for Creativity in the Classroom

Using Imagination, Play and Creativity

I was reading Brookfield’s Skillful Teacher (2015) on using imagination, play and creativity inside the classroom and came across a brief mention on page 126 about John Bohannon’s TED talk proposal for science PhD candidates to present their dissertations through …dance.

I knew I had to look up his talk, and here it is! Bohannon proposes that we use dance to justify major policy decisions: “Rather than dancing our Ph.Ds, we should use dance to explain all of our complex problems. Imagine our politicians using dance to explain why we must invade a foreign country or bail out an investment bank. It’s sure to help.” What a different world it would be!

And if you would like to read more about the Dancing for Your PhD competition, and see some very creative entries, you can see a good article here. And if you have a PhD thesis that you wish to submit to dance, the competition opens every year with a deadline in June, with details here.

References

Bohannon, J. (2011). Dance vs. PowerPoint, a modest proposal. TEDx Brussels. Retrieved from https://www.ted.com/talks/john_bohannon_dance_vs_powerpoint_a_modest_proposal

Brookfield, S. (2015). The Skillful Teacher. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Using Imagination, Play and Creativity