Lifelong Learning

I told a friend earlier today that I will be continuing my studies next year, after I finish my Provincial Instructors Diploma in Adult Education. Her amused and sincere reaction was “What, you want MORE school?? Haven’t you had enough?”

Well, no.

And I will never have enough.

People in my family live very long lives, and I intend to continue living, and learning, for a very long time. As an instructor, I am a holder and communicator of knowledge – but I also come to the profession fueled by a deep and insatiable curiosity and desire to learn. And I hope to instill some of this in my students – whether they are 17 or 71.

I don’t recall many periods of my life when I was bored. There is so much around me that is interesting, that I want to know more about. I am enthused about undertaking a new topic, or learning about a new theory, or putting into practice new steps – whether they are in sports, or in a new technique, or in a new way of thinking. I love to read, and I love to listen to stories and accounts of historical events. I think I inherited this from my father, who was very curious about life around him and was always keen to spend time with me, to discuss current events or advances in technology. My mother, too, is a voracious reader. So it’s natural that I have learned to love books and newspapers, and learning about the world.

Some of the ways that I keep up in my core profession are: attending marketing seminars, subscriptions to journals and following thought leaders on social media. And it is the same, too, in my profession as educator – I attend conferences when I can, I follow many blogs, I read books and journal articles. When I complete the PID (which is soon!!) I hope to join a learning community in which instructors share stories, read books together, and generally keep in touch as a mode of support and sharing of what we are learning, what we are trying, and best practices from our time in the classroom or in online rooms.

I hope to instill a love of learning in my students, to make learning fun. Through this degree I have learned so many tools and techniques to raise students’ interest when it is flagging in class (because of the late hour – I teach many evening courses – or perhaps because the topic needs sprucing up). I have learned that students learn in various ways – by doing, by listening, by reading, by interacting with one another. In my classes I want to offer my students opportunities to learn – from me, from one another – and to find it fun and engaging. It’s a continuous process, sometimes it works, and sometimes it works less well – but I will keep trying. A life of learning, lifelong learning, is just much more fun.

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Christy Pongo – Open Book, 2014 – CC Attribution-NonCommercial
Lifelong Learning

What are Ethics? [video]

Although we might not realize it, we all face ethical issues on a regular basis. But how do we know how to respond well to these issues, to make better (as opposed to worse) ethical decisions? In this TEDx talk Dr. Michael D. Burroughs discusses the numerous kinds of ethical issues we face, possibilities for increasing our ethical awareness as “everyday ethicists,” and the importance of introducing ethics and philosophical education in our schools. Dr. Burroughs also discusses the role of ethics in the lives of children and ways in which adults can attempt to understand and learn from children in ethical discussions.

Why are we avoiding issues of ethics, and why are we avoiding engaging in respectful and civil dialogue about ethics? Many people simply do not have the tools to address issues of ethics.

Dr. Burroughs works with small children (ages 3, 4 or 5 years old) and observes the sense of ethics that already exists in people of such a young age. The respect, humility and eagerness to recognize issues of fairness and ethics is already displayed in young children.

When children already have such an ingrained sense of ethics, at what point of our lives do we begin to doubt this sense, or even lose it? This video inspired me, and made me think about my own ethical journey. I hope that you will enjoy this video as well.

What are Ethics? [video]

Faculty Focus on Critical Thinking

By coincidence, an excellent first-person article about critical thinking landed on my desk this morning. The author, Amy Mulnix, explains how she teaches creative thinking to her young students by being transparent about the process.

“What is it that my brain does when I’m integrating information? My first answer was that I just “see” the connections and parallels. How do I explain that to students? Fortunately, previous reflections served me well and a strategy came to me in the moment. I suggested we start by identifying the major ideas, topics, and characters from previous chapters. As we made the lists on the whiteboard, I felt a wave of relief as I personally started to see more connections among the material—connections I hadn’t identified before arriving in class. This gave me confidence that I had stumbled in the right direction.”

The article in full is found here on Faculty Focus

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Max S, Brain, Goodfon.su

Reference

Mulnix, A. (2016). The Power of Transparency in Your Teaching. Retrieved from http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/instructional-design/power-transparency-teaching/

Faculty Focus on Critical Thinking